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Business analysis is simply the ability to identify business needs and develop proper solutions to meet the identified needs by applying sound analysis techniques that make the solution feasible.

Most of the business cases face challenges in defining the exact needs and setting a solution scope, this is where several important business analysis techniques can be employed:

  • MOST (Mission, Objectives, Strategies and Tactics) – Identifying each of these elements allows business analysts to conduct a thorough internal analysis of what an organization is aiming to accomplish and how best to go about doing that.
  • PESTLE (Political, Economic, Sociological, Technological, Legal and Environmental) – This model is used by business analysts to evaluate various external factors that will impact their company and determine how to address them.
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) – This business analysis technique is used to identify areas of both strength and weakness within a corporate structure and translate them into opportunities and threats, which helps in determining the proper allocation of resources.
  • MoSCoW (Must or Should, Could or Would) – This process allows for the prioritization of requirements by presenting a framework in which each individual requirement can be evaluated relative to the others. Is it a must-have? Something the project should have? Something that could improve the deliverable? Or something that would be a good future addition?
  • CATWOE (Customers, Actors, Transformation Process, World View, Owner and Environmental Constraints) – This business analysis technique identifies the main parties and processes that will be affected by any action the business undertakes. This makes it possible for business analysts to thoroughly evaluate the impact of any proposed action under consideration.
  • The 5 Whys – A mainstay of both Six Sigma and business analysis techniques, this series of leading questions helps business analysts single out the root cause of a problem by asking why a situation exists, then subjecting the answer to another “why?”, and so on.
  • Six Thinking Hats – This process is used to direct a group’s line of thinking during a brainstorming session by considering alternate perspectives and ideas. The “six hats” in this technique are categorized as White (logical, data-driven thinking), Red (emotion-based reactions), Black (adverse thinking, focused on cons), Yellow (positive thinking, focused on pros), Green (creative thinking) and Blue (big-picture overview).

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Reference used: http://www.artviper.net/wp/seo/five-effective-business-analysis-techniques/

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